How to pick an author

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           Yes, I think it’s fair to ponder what the author of your book is made up of. Is he or she made up of the same things you are? It’s a relevant question. You look for certain expectations in a friend, a love mate, a roommate, a leader. Of course we entertain the possibility of the opposite to ourselves, but that is not so much a complete opposite as it is someone with different attributes and aspirations—we will not ever be happy sitting down to eat with someone who only enjoys devouring sewer rats, while we have a craving for chewing on ants dipped in honey. No, I did not ponder that distinction for very long.

Once I read a book, I draw conclusions as to what I have experienced, and I make a decision if I want to follow this author. Yes, the style of writing has much to do with it; as does the pace, the twists in plot, the development of characters and how they interact. But most important for me is the world that was created: the values, the morality, the love, the hate, the needs, the expectations, and the issues which define who they all are. I don’t want to be in a world where the depraved are the heroes. I don’t want to find myself crying for all the characters who have been tossed aside by the author’s pen just so I am forced to spew up some emotional loss that is planted to cover the failure of the plot to carry me along.

I get it that a good story involves loss, involves the possibility of total loss even. I don’t get it that the plot must end in dread and dire remorse. That’s not a story worth reading; that’s a tale too already fulfilled by the stress of real life and circumstance. I want a story to deliver a promise of a better future, a fuller life, a possibility for growth and redemption.

So, yes I write that way. My first book The Druid and the Flower is very much about love and growth, flawed heroes who must fight even greater odds. And I make sure the lines are blurred even as the obstacles increase. There is no better judge of character than the one who is under pressure. Nor do I spare the good to be saintly or the bad to be the spawn of the devil, for that is also a fallacy. Good people do bad things, and bad people do good things. In the end we must leave it to the gods to decide who in more worthy to dine with the Devine.

In my second book, Ashima, I go one step further. There I take the idea of parental love and lock it into what is more important, survival or freedom? I take the idea of lost and evil and move it to a place where it might be good, and I take power and love to the fire of impossibility where it must choose a path.

I have lived long enough to realize decisions are not always logical, and not all logical decisions are rational.

In my final book of the series, Dawn of Magic, I present a possibility that even now as a race we might have an ability to correct a most perplexing mistake: technology versus the spiritual, what is the best fit?

Come read the first two books. The last will be out in a few months; it is complete, awaiting the final edit. I give away nothing when I promise you that as an author I carry an optimistic outlook for mankind.

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